Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://covid-19.conacyt.mx/jspui/handle/1000/3852
Identifying common pharmacotherapies associated with reduced COVID-19 morbidity using electronic health records
Victor M Castro.
Rachel A Ross.
Sean MJ McBride.
Roy H Perlis.
Acceso Abierto
Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas
10.1101/2020.04.11.20061994
Importance: Absent a vaccine or any established treatments for the novel and highly infectious coronavirus-19 (COVID-19), rapid efforts to identify potential therapeutics are required. Objective: To identify commonly-prescribed medications that may be associated with lesser risk of morbidity with COVID-19 across 5 Eastern Massachusetts hospitals. Design: In silico cohort using electronic health records between 7/1/2019 and 4/07/2020. Setting: Outpatient, emergency department and inpatient settings from 2 academic medical centers and 3 community hospitals. Participants: All individuals presenting to a clinical site and undergoing COVID-19 testing. Main Outcome or Measure: Inpatient hospitalization; documented requirement for mechanical ventilation. Results: Among 12,818 individuals with COVID-19 testing results available, 2271 (17.7%) were test-positive, and 707/2271 (31.1%) were hospitalized in one of 5 hospitals. Based on a comparison of ranked electronic prescribing frequencies, medications enriched among test-positive individuals not requiring hospitalization included ibuprofen, valacyclovir, and naproxen. Among individuals who were hospitalized, mechanical ventilation was documented in 213 (30.1%); ibuprofen and naproxen were also more commonly prescribed among individuals not requiring ventilation. Conclusions and Relevance: These preliminary findings suggest that electronic health records may be applied to identify medications associated with lower risk of morbidity with COVID-19, but larger cohorts will be required to address confounding by indication. Larger scale efforts at repositioning may help to identify FDA-approved medications meriting study for prevention of COVID-19 morbidity and mortality.
www.medrxiv.org
2020
Artículo
https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.04.11.20061994v1.full.pdf
Inglés
VIRUS RESPIRATORIOS
Appears in Collections:Artículos científicos

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